Departmental Liability for Failure-to-Train

ARTICLES, JUSTIFICATION
Lack of training puts the department at risk of being held liable Nothing is as important as making sure law enforcement officers receive proper training Nothing is as important as making sure law enforcement officers receive proper training. Not only does it increase their chances for winning confrontations, the lack of such puts the department at risk of being held liable, according to guidelines set in the 1989 US Supreme Court ruling, City of Canton, Ohio v. Geraldine Harris. Content is paraphrased from full article.  Link below. Training Liability Sources In the year 2000, Darrell L. Ross of the East Carolina University at Greenville, North Carolina conducted a study of failure-to-train Section 1983 cases. Ross did a content analysis of 1,525 cases (from 1989 - 1999) to determine the 10…
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Case Law for the need for live-fire shoot/don’t shoot judgment training.

ARTICLES, JUSTIFICATION
Case Law for live-fire shoot/don’t shoot judgment training The following court cases show the need for live-fire shoot/don’t shoot judgment training Zuchel vs. City and County of Denver, Colorado opinion Plaintiff’s son was shot and killed by a city police officer during a street disturbance. The plaintiff settled claims against the police officer before the trial, and the jury considered only federal civil rights claims against the city. The jury awarded damages of $330,000.00, finding that the department’s training program, which constituted only a movie and a lecture on the use of deadly force, to be constitutionally inadequate. Federal appeals court upheld this result, finding that the training provided was inadequate and indicated that the city was “deliberately indifferent” to the need for more training on the use of deadly…
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